Abandoned Margins: Policing the Black Female Body

EXHIBITION DATES: JANUARY 15 – FEBRUARY 25, 2016

FINAL ENTRY DEADLINE: OCTOBER 25, 2015

NOTIFICATIONS: NOVEMBER 11, 2015

SUBMISSIONS: CLICK HERE TO SUBMIT WORK TO THIS CALL FOR ART

IMAGE_PotbellyHoneyBooAndTheRiseofBacon

Shoshanna Weinberger, “Potbelly Honey Boo and the Rise of Bacon”, 74.25″ x 60″ gouache on paper, 2012

Exhibition conceived and selections curated by: Janice Bond, multimedia artist, curator, and arts advocate.

Exhibition Description:“He grabbed me, twisted my arm on my back and shoved me in the grass and starting pulling the back of my braids. I was telling him to get off me because my back was hurting bad,” said 15 year old Dajerria Becton of her attempted arrest at a pool party.

“I will light you up! Get out! Now!” said the officer as he drew a stun gun and pointed it at 28 year old Sandra Bland after she refused to leave her car following the receipt of her ticket.

Representations of black women in US popular culture and public discourse frequently depict them stereotypically as overweight and asexual or hypersexualized and in need of less protection, but more policing for moral failures. The black female body then becomes an object in the faces of power, brutality, and fetishism– detached from the name and identity it belongs to. Abandoned Margins will feature works of art that seek to create a new and empowering visual language that challenges the supremacist systems under which black female bodies are marginalized and lack agency.

Bio: Janice Bond is a communications, programs, and business development strategist specializing in arts and culture. Over the past decade, Bond has orchestrated a range of curatorial projects and programs, interactive, and creative marketing campaigns.

In the community, she lends her time to multiple organizations and institutions as a gracious speaker, board member, volunteer, and mentor. In 2013, she was appointed Director of Arts and Culture at IMAN with a focus of using art as a tool for social justice and restorative healing on Chicago’s Southwest Side and beyond.
Janice opened Gallery Oni in 2014, a contemporary art gallery and cultural space located in Chicago, Illinois. As a visual/multimedia artist, her original paintings, installations, and collective soundscapes focus on human perspective, sacred geometry, identity, sound frequencies, and indigenous fractal patterns found in various cultures and urban landscapes.

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